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Vox Solid State Australian catalogue - late 1966

Below, pictures of the solid state brochure drawn up by JMI for the Australian market in late 1966. Nicholson's was a long-standing Vox distributor:

Above, the basic foot-pedal and the optional extra.

The foot-pedal shown at the British Musical Instrument Industries Trade Fair at the Russell Square in August 1966 is offered, at this stage, as an optional extra. The illustrations show the amps in their format and with their pre-production names. What was released as the "Virtuoso" is here the "Supreme", and what was released as the "Supreme" is the "Beatle".

The prices (in Australian dollars) of the various production models were later noted in ink:

Supreme/Virtuoso: $505 AU

Conqueror: $965 AU

Defiant: $1035 AU

Beatle/Supreme: $1450 AU

Dynamic Bass: $845 AU

Foundation Bass: $975 AU

Super Foundation Bass: $1170 AU

These equate by and large to the prices given in the .

The text in the lower left-hand panel expands on that of the advert published in "Melody Maker" magazine, 20th August, 1966.

Vox advert for the solid state line in Melody Maker, August 1966

"Melody Maker", 20th August, 1966, lower half of the advert.

The "Watchdog" was one of the elements adopted from the solid state amps issued by Thomas Organ under the Vox name in America. The limiter effectively throttled the volume when the output section neared the point of breakdown distortion. Jack Bruce was not a fan, presumably having tried a Super Beatle or something similiar on Cream's tour of the US in late March / early April 1967:

"Beat Instrumental" no. 51, July 1967.

Fortunately, the JMI engineers decided against the Watchdog, prefering instead full thermal cut-out to protect the output transistors. The dreadful bulldog motif was by and large ditched too, though it was retained for certain accessories.

Vox Precision Guitar Strings

The bulldog cliche on Vox Precision Guitar Strings.